PAETE.ORG FORUMS
Paetenians Home on the Net

HOME | ABOUT PAETE | USAP PAETE MUNISIPYO  | MEMBERS ONLY  | PICTORIAL PAETE | SINING PAETE  | LINKS  |

FORUM GUIDELINES
please read before posting

USAP PAETE Forum Index USAP PAETE
Discussion Forums for the people of Paete, Laguna, Philippines
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch    UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

(Health) Fatigue

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic   printer-friendly view    USAP PAETE Forum Index -> Science Lessons Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 2:17 pm    Post subject: (Health) Fatigue Reply with quote






John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
1 June 2006

Fatigue a lasting problem after liver transplantation

A new study on fatigue experienced by patients after undergoing liver transplantation found that it is a major problem that does not tend to improve with the passage of time. Liver transplant patients experience physical fatigue and reduced activity rather than mental fatigue and reduced motivation.
The results of this study appear in the June 2006 issue of Liver Transplantation, the official journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS). The journal is published on behalf of the societies by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and is available online via Wiley InterScience at http://www.interscience.wiley......lantation.

Although fatigue is common in end-stage liver disease and can even contribute to the need for a liver transplant, few studies have been conducted on fatigue after liver transplants take place. In the current study, researchers led by Rita van den Berg-Emons, Ph.D. of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, assessed 96 liver transplant patients who visited the hospital's outpatient clinic between February and June 2003. The patients were given a series of self-administered questionnaires: the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) measured fatigue severity; the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) measured the nature of fatigue; two additional questionnaires measured the patients' disability level and their health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In addition, the researchers assessed patients' age, gender, reason for having the transplant, time since the transplant took place, and the number of immunosuppressive agents they were taking.

The results showed that 66 percent of the patients were fatigued, 44 percent were severely fatigued, and there was no indication that fatigue lessened over time. "This is the first study to provide information on both the severity and nature of fatigue after liver transplantation, and on factors associated with the severity of fatigue," the authors note. As with a previous study, the patients experienced physical fatigue and reduced activity rather than mental fatigue and reduced motivation. "These findings imply that fatigue after liver transplantation might be reduced with rehabilitation programs focusing on improving activity patterns and physical fitness," the authors state. They found a weak relationship between severity of fatigue and gender and age (women experienced more fatigue) and a stronger relationship between self-assessed disabilities and HRQoL. This may be because fatigue may lead to an inactive lifestyle which in turn may lead to an impaired quality of life. Neither the condition necessitating the transplant nor the number of immunosuppressive agents was associated with the severity of fatigue, the study found.

The authors conclude: "These findings imply that rehabilitation programs, focusing on improving activity patterns and physical fitness, may reduce complaints of fatigue after liver transplantation. However, the effect of rehabilitation on fatigue has to be established in future research."

In an accompanying editorial in the same issue, Jayant A. Talwalkar, M.D., M.P.H. of the Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, MN notes that while many symptoms of liver disease resolve following transplant, fatigue is one that remains, for reasons as yet unclear. The strengths of the current study, according to the author, are that it used valid instruments to measure fatigue, it confirmed the role of physical function in fatigue, and it described the strong relationship between fatigue and lower HRQoL. However, the findings conflicted with an earlier study in which fatigue was less common in patients four to five years post-transplant. This may be due to response shift, where patients experienced a positive change in attitude after the traumatic experience of surviving the transplant, or it may be due to the lack of a psychological assessment and the role of anxiety/depression in causing fatigue in the current study. Regarding the link between fatigue and reduced physical activity, the author notes that two recent studies on the effects of physical rehabilitation showed positive results on physical fitness and quality of life. However, no studies have been performed so far on effects of physical rehabilitation on complaints of fatigue. The author concludes that "the time has come to shift gears by identifying efficacious interventions which improve physical function, fatigue, and HRQL in this population," and suggests that in cases where exercise is ineffective, novel drug therapies may need to be tested and impaired cognitive function may also need to be examined as a possible cause of fatigue.


###
Article: "Fatigue Is a Major Problem After Liver Transplantation," Rita van den Berg-Emons, Berbke van Ginneken, Markus Wijffels, Hugo Tilanus, Herold Metselaar, Henk Stam, Geert Kazemier, Liver Transplantation; June 2006 (DOI: 10.1002/lt.20684).

Editorial: "Determining the Nature and Impact of Fatigue After Liver Transplantation," Jayant A. Talwalkar, Liver Transplantation; June 2006 (DOI: 10.1002/lt.20781).

*************************************************************

Questions to explore further this topic:

When is being tired normal?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/co.....ess2.shtml

What is fatigue?

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medline.....003088.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatigue_(physical)
http://www.emedicinehealth.com.....cle_em.htm
http://www.betterhealth.vic.go.....enDocument

What are the types of fatigue?

http://www.tbiguide.com/fatigue.html

What is mental fatigue?

http://www.betterhealthusa.com/public/235.cfm

Fatigue in children and adolescents

http://www.health24.com/fitnes.....,34618.asp
http://www.kidsgrowth.com/reso.....cfm?id=228
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2296/6/33
http://www.intl.elsevierhealth.....2000_2.pdf

Fatigue and the workplace

http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers.....tigue.html

The psychological side of fatigue

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi.....5/7362/480

What usually causes fatigue?

Anemia
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medline.....000560.htm

Sleep disorders
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medline.....000800.htm

Asthma
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medline.....000141.htm

Hypothyroidism
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medline.....000353.htm

Depression
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medline.....003213.htm

Fatigue and cancer

http://www.cancer.gov/cancerto.....ue/patient
http://www.cancersymptoms.org/fatigue/index.shtml

Fatigue and AIDS

http://www.thebody.com/nmai/fatigue.html

Fatigue and multiple sclerosis

http://www.nationalmssociety.o.....atigue.asp

What is drowsiness?

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medline.....003208.htm

What is chronic fatigue syndrome?

http://familydoctor.org/031.xml
http://www.mayoclinic.com/heal.....me/DS00395
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dise.....t/what.htm

What is adrenal fatigue?

http://www.adrenalfatigue.org/

What is the liver?

http://www.paete.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1765

What is a liver transplant?

http://www.liverfoundation.org/db/articles/1016

GAMES

http://www.cbc.ca/kids/olympics/games/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 8:11 am    Post subject: Chronic fatigue syndrome impairs a person's slow wave activi Reply with quote

American Academy of Sleep Medicine
1 May 2007

Chronic fatigue syndrome impairs a person's slow wave activity during sleep

WESTCHESTER, Ill. -- Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has been associated with altered amounts of slow wave sleep, which could reflect reduced electroencephalograph (EEG) activity and impaired sleep regulation. A study published in the May 1st issue of the journal SLEEP finds that CFS is also associated with a blunted slow wave activity (SWA) response to sleep challenge, suggesting an impairment of the basic sleep drive and homeostatic response.

The study, authored by Roseanna Armitage, PhD, and colleagues at the University of Michigan, focused on 13 pairs of identical twins discordant for CFS. Analyses, which were restricted to the first four non-REM periods each night in order to show comparability, revealed that SWA, or other sleep EEG measures, did not differ between the CFS and healthy twins during a regular night's sleep. According to Armitage, it was only after a "challenge" to sleep regulation was introduced (keeping them awake an extra four hours) that the CFS twins exhibited significantly less SWA power in the first non-REM period of recovery sleep and accumulated a smaller percentage of SWA in the first non-REM period than their twin counterparts.

"CFS shares symptoms with depression, and some experts have suggested that it is not a distinctly different disorder," said Armitage. "We have also conducted studies of SWA response to sleep challenge in depression, and the results are very different. Depressed women did not show a blunted SWA response to sleep challenge. The present CFS study included only women, and none had current depression. Therefore, our results cannot be explained on the basis of depression."

Experts recommend that adults get between seven and eight hours of sleep each night to maintain good health and optimum performance.

Persons who think they might have a sleep disorder are urged to consult with their primary care physician, who will refer them to a sleep specialist.

###
SLEEP is the official journal of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC, a joint venture of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and the Sleep Research Society.

SleepEducation.com, a Web site maintained by the AASM, provides information about the various sleep disorders that exist, the forms of treatment available, recent news on the topic of sleep, sleep studies that have been conducted and a listing of sleep facilities.

For a copy of this article, entitled, "The Impact of a Four-Hour Sleep Delay on Slow Wave Activity in Twins Discordant for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome", or to arrange an interview with an AASM spokesperson regarding this study, please contact Jim Arcuri, public relations coordinator, at (708)492-0930, ext. 9317, or jarcuri@aasmnet.org.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2007 8:04 am    Post subject: Herb shows potential to reduce cancer-related fatigue Reply with quote

Mayo Clinic
2 June 2007

Herb shows potential to reduce cancer-related fatigue

North Central Cancer Treatment Group reports on pilot ginseng study
CHICAGO -- North Central Cancer Treatment Group ( http://ncctg/ ) (NCCTG) researchers, based at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have generated preliminary data suggesting that a form of American ginseng provides greater improvements in fatigue and vitality in patients who receive the highest doses tested, compared to lower doses or no treatment.

The results of their scientifically rigorous pilot study, the first to evaluate the Wisconsin species of American ginseng as a possible therapy for cancer-related fatigue, are being presented June 3 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Many cancer patients face extreme fatigue after diagnosis and during treatment. Getting more sleep or rest often does not relieve the fatigue, nor is it related to activity levels. Other than exercise, there isn’t a good solution available for these patients.

“We hope that Wisconsin ginseng may offer us a much-needed treatment to improve our patients’ quality of life, and we look forward to further evaluation,” says Debra Barton, Ph.D. ( http://mayoresearch.mayo.edu/m.....ton_dl.cfm ), a registered nurse, Mayo Clinic cancer researcher ( http://cancercenter.mayo.edu/ ) and the study’s primary investigator.

“Cancer-related fatigue is one of the most profound and distressing issues patients face,” she says. This unique type of fatigue can have dozens of causes, and for patients who have completed cancer therapy, fatigue is among their foremost concerns, second only to fear of disease recurrence.”

Traditional Chinese medicine and current understanding of ginseng’s function both point to its characteristics as an adaptogen -- a substance that helps the body overcome the effects of environmental stress. Since cancer patients have stressors ranging from the psychological stress of diagnosis to the physiological stresses of chemotherapy and radiation, if ginseng helps, the researchers think it would be a valuable addition to currently available therapies.

“With animal data indicating the possibilities of ginseng with respect to increased swimming endurance, and the availability and verified product quality of Wisconsin ginseng, we decided to move forward with a pilot study,” says Dr. Barton.

The investigators enrolled 282 patients in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, averaging 71 patients per each of four arms, with between 39 and 48 patients in each arm completing the eight weeks of treatment. Treatment arms consisted of placebo, and three different daily doses of Wisconsin ginseng -- 750, 1,000 and 2,000 milligrams.

Of the four treatment arms, patients receiving the placebo and the lowest dose of ginseng reported very little improvement in fatigue or other areas of physical or psychological well-being. The patients receiving the larger doses showed improvements in overall energy levels, reporting higher vitality levels and less interference with activity from fatigue. They also reported an improvement in overall mental, physical, spiritual and emotional well-being.

Because this was a pilot trial designed to pinpoint which aspects of fatigue ginseng might help alleviate, determine likely dosage options, and identify possible side effects, Dr. Barton cautions against immediate addition of ginseng supplements to any patient’s therapeutic regimen. “While results were promising, we have more research to conduct,” she says. “And besides, it’s just not a good idea to grab the nearest bottle on the supermarket shelf — consumers need to research the company and the product. Because there is less federal regulation of dietary supplements, there is no consistency in currently available products. In fact, some research has shown various supplements to contain little or no amount of the ingredient on the label, and sometimes even harmful contaminants.”

Dr. Barton’s research team hopes to open a new clinical trial in 2008 looking at a specific dose of Wisconsin ginseng versus placebo and trying to better refine the results, in hopes of a confirming a new treatment option for cancer-related fatigue.

According to the National Center for Health Statistics (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/), Americans spend between $36 billion and $47 billion per year on complementary and alternative therapies, including herbal supplements. A recent study ( http://www.mayoclinicproceedin.....t&UID= ) authored by Mayo Clinic resident Aditya Bardia, M.D., reports that two-thirds of people who use herbs do not use any scientific evidence-based information to guide their purchases. To aid consumers in their decision-making process, Mayo Clinic recently published a book addressing current knowledge regarding a number of complementary and alternative therapies. The Mayo Clinic Book of Alternative Medicine ( http://bookstore.mayoclinic.co.....fm?mpid=35) dispels myths and sheds light on therapies that have been scientifically studied for safety and effectiveness.

###
VIDEO ALERT: Sound bites from doctor and patient will be available Thursday, 5/31, through Pathfire’s Digital Media Gateway (DMG). See the end of this release for details.

Elizabeth Zimmermann
507-284-5005 (days)
507-284-2511 (evenings)
e-mail: newsbureau@mayo.edu

In Chicago 651-338-0656

EMBARGOED: Hold for release until Sunday, June 3, 2007, 9:30 a.m., CDT American Society of Clinical Oncology

The ginseng study was a collaborative trial of the North Central Cancer Treatment Group and Mayo Clinic and was supported by a number of Public Health Service ( http://commcorps.shs.net/default.aspx ) grants. The ginseng used in the study was provided by members of the Ginseng Research Institute of America. Other Mayo Clinic researchers included Brent Bauer, M.D.; Jeff Sloan, Ph.D.; Heshan Liu; and Charles Loprinzi, M.D. Collaborating researchers from other NCCTG member or affiliate institutions included Gamini Soori, M.D., Missouri Valley Cancer Consortium, Omaha, Neb.; Patricia Johnson, M.D., Carle Cancer Center Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP), Urbana, Ill.; Cesar Figueras, R.N., B.S.N., Michigan Cancer Research Consortium, Ann Arbor, Mich.; Steven Duane, M.D., Metro-Minnesota CCOP, St. Louis Park, Minn.; and Shaker Dakhil, M.D., Wichita CCOP, Wichita, Kan. A number of other institutions also participated within their relationship to the NCCTG.

Based at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., NCCTG is a national clinical research group sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. NCCTG is a network of more than 400 community-based cancer treatment clinics in the United States, Canada and Mexico that work with Mayo Clinic to conduct clinical studies for advancing cancer treatment.

To obtain the latest news releases from Mayo Clinic, go to www.mayoclinic.org/news. MayoClinic.com (www.mayoclinic.com) is available as a resource for your health stories.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2007 9:42 pm    Post subject: Why exertion leads to exhaustion Reply with quote

University of Exeter
20 December 2007
Why exertion leads to exhaustion

Scientists have found an explanation for runners who struggle to increase their pace, cyclists who can’t pedal any faster and swimmers who can’t speed up their strokes. Researchers from the University of Exeter and Kansas State University have discovered the dramatic changes that occur in our muscles when we push ourselves during exercise.

We all have a sustainable level of exercise intensity, known as the ‘critical power’. This level can increase as we get fitter, but will always involve us working at around 75-80% of our maximal capacity. Published in the American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, this research shows why, when we go beyond this level, we have to slow down or stop altogether. This is the first time that scientists have looked at processes taking place inside the muscles when we exceed the critical power.

The study showed that when we exceed our critical power, the normally-stable pH level in our muscles, is quickly pushed to levels typical of exhaustion. Moreover, the level of phosphocreatine in the muscles, a high-energy compound which serves as an energy reserve, is quickly depleted when exercise intensity exceeds the critical power.

Professor Andy Jones of the University of Exeter, lead author on the paper, said: “The concept of ‘critical power’ is well known by sportspeople, but until now we have not known why our bodies react so dramatically when we exceed it. We were astonished by the speed and scale of change in the muscles.”

The research team used a magnetic resonance scanner to assess changes in metabolites in the leg muscles of six male volunteers who exercised just below and just above the critical power.

The research offers a physical explanation for the experiences of exercisers of all levels of ability. Professor Jones concludes: “The results indicate that the critical power represents the highest exercise intensity that is sustainable aerobically. This means that it is likely to be an important intensity for maximising training gains. Exercising above the critical power cannot be sustained for long because it is associated with changes in the muscle which lead to fatigue.”
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic   printer-friendly view    USAP PAETE Forum Index -> Science Lessons Forum All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group